Part I: The Tegea Sculptures

SELECT CATALOGUE

This catalogue lists thirty-two of the one hundred and fifty pieces of sculpture in Tegea and Athens attributable to the akroteria, pediments and metopes of the Tegean temple. Although the conclusions reached in this book are based on study of the entire corpus of extant remains from the site, publication rights to the fifty or sixty fragments discovered after Dugas' Le Sanctuaire d'Alea Athéna à Tégée appeared in 1924 belong elsewhere, ruling out a full catalogue for the present. I would like, however, to thank Professor C. Christou, Dr. A. Delivorrias, Dr. G. Steinhauer, and Dr. A. Demakopoulou for enabling me to describe and illustrate all the major pieces of sculpture from the temple: included with their permission are nos. 3, 7, 8, 10, 15, 19, 21, 27-32.

Criteria for the attribution of architectural sculpture to the akroteria, pediments or metopes of a temple are usually five in number: the findspots, the iconography of the sculptures (which may or may not be supplemented by literary evidence from ancient sources), the marble used, the technique, and the scale of the figures (in no particular order of precedence).

In the case of Tegea, 1 the evidence of the findspots2 does not, I think, apply except perhaps as regards no. 13. The widely scattered proveniences of the fragments testify eloquently to the thoroughness of the destruction and plundering of the temple at the end of the Roman period; unlike those of the temple of Asklepios at Epidaurus and the temple of Zeus at Olympia, 3 many of the Tegea sculptures seem to have been carried far for use as building material (the Nike akroterion fragment no. 3, which must weigh nearly a ton, was transported almost a quarter of a mile to the house in which it was found in 1964, for instance). On the wide Arcadian plain, rock outcrops of any sort are conspicuously absent, and field-stones provide nothing that is comparable in size for house- building. Furthermore, we can draw no conclusions from those fragments actually found within the temple area: the boar's head (no. 5), which must belong to the east pediment according to Pausanias (Appendix 1, no. 36) was found to the northwest; the head with the lionskin cap (no. 16), which ought to come from the west pediment, to the northeast of the temple; and the new arm fragment with a shield grip (no. 21), again probably from the west pediment, in the walls to the northeast. It seems that either we accept the evidence of the findspots, and are thus forced to assume that Pausanias misread his own notes (an unlikely possibility in view of his extended description of the sculptures in the east pediment, obviously taken down on the spot) or ignore them completely and concentrate on alternative methods of restoring the sculptures.

Thus, in the catalogue, all fragments for which no specific provenience is given were

-5-

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Skopas of Paros
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations (at End) ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction: Methods of Approach 1
  • Part I: the Tegea Sculptures 5
  • Chapter One - Technique 39
  • Chapter Two - Composition 48
  • Chapter Three - Iconography and Interpretation 59
  • Chapter Four - Style 70
  • Chapter Five - Skopas in Tegea 80
  • Part Ii: Skopas 85
  • Chapter Six - Antecedents 85
  • Appendix 90
  • Chapter Eight Skopas in Asia 101
  • Chapter Nine Late Works 110
  • Part Iii: Documentation 126
  • Appendix 1 the Literary Sources 126
  • Notes 135
  • Appendix 2 Classical, Hellenistic and Roman Representations of the Calydonian Hunt 136
  • Appendix 3 the Arcadian Dynasty 138
  • Appendix 4 Copies of Major Works Considered in Chafters 7-9 139
  • Appendix 5 Proportions of the Los Angeles Herakles, Lansdowne Herakles and Meleager (cf. Plates 31, 42 and 44) 147
  • Select Bibliography 149
  • Notes 152
  • General Index 177
  • Index of Sources 183
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