Chapter Two
COMPOSITION

The reader is referred to PLATE 53 throughout. The reconstructions of the pediments are not intended to be anything more than hypothetical; they are sketches to indicate possible positions for the figures more economically than can be done by words alone, and for quick reference later. It is to be hoped that the new excavations planned by the Archaeological Service will soon require their modification as new fragments come to light. The descriptions and arguments have their own value, however, and may be found useful by future students even when fuller evidence becomes available.

This chapter explores the possibility of restoring the composition of the sculptural decoration, as far as the small quantity and bad state of preservation of the significant pieces will allow. It attempts to reconstruct the positions and poses of the figures, with special attention to the possibility of visual links between the akroteria, pediments and metopes, and to the question of optical corrections. Attributions for the major pieces have already been ventured in the catalogue, and, building on this foundation, I propose the following as criteria for the reconstructions:
1. The restored heights of the figures.
2. The technique and degree of finish of the fragments.
3. Sculptural differentiation in the modelling.
4. Asymmetry and perspective distortions.
5. Weathering (although the possibility of secondary weathering is raised by the find circumstances of many of the pieces, e.g. no. 12).
6. The identities of the figures and the text of Pausanias (Appendix 1, no. 36). 1

Nos. 1, 2, 5 and 6 require no further comment; the others are less straightforward, however, and call for a brief note. In ideal circumstances, sculptural criteria alone (nos. 3 and 4) should give an optimum visual angle for the piece concerned, and thus its place on the building, although as the mountain of literature devoted to the composition of the east pediment at Olympia shows, the results obtained from this method can be contradictory and misleading, and by no means provide a final answer even when the figures are well preserved.

Clues from sculptural differentiation and perspective distortions are particularly subject to misinterpretation, since not only have we virtually no knowledge of theories of perspective in Greek art before Euclid, but also it is clear from the remains that the extent of such adjustments in sculpture varied at different times and that hard and fast rules were probably never applied. 2

Solutions were empirical and ad hoc, governed perhaps by whether the sculptor wished to assist the three-dimensional impression created by a figure turned slightly away from frontal, or to counteract the near disappearance of the far side of a strongly three- quarter or near profile figure--the former would require a decrease in the volume of the withdrawn side, the latter an increase. 3 Equally important would be the viewpoint intended for the observer; the Corfu pediment, 17.02 m wide, seems to have been designed for a central viewpoint, but opinion is divided as to whether this held true for the east pediment at Olympia (width, 26.40 m): Pfuhl, for instance, conjectured at least three viewpoints. 4 Although there are in fact some indications that a central viewpoint was intended at Tegea (pediment width, 16.45 m), it is likely that in any case the strong distortions logically demanded by a strict central viewpoint were avoided or

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skopas of Paros
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations (at End) ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction: Methods of Approach 1
  • Part I: the Tegea Sculptures 5
  • Chapter One - Technique 39
  • Chapter Two - Composition 48
  • Chapter Three - Iconography and Interpretation 59
  • Chapter Four - Style 70
  • Chapter Five - Skopas in Tegea 80
  • Part Ii: Skopas 85
  • Chapter Six - Antecedents 85
  • Appendix 90
  • Chapter Eight Skopas in Asia 101
  • Chapter Nine Late Works 110
  • Part Iii: Documentation 126
  • Appendix 1 the Literary Sources 126
  • Notes 135
  • Appendix 2 Classical, Hellenistic and Roman Representations of the Calydonian Hunt 136
  • Appendix 3 the Arcadian Dynasty 138
  • Appendix 4 Copies of Major Works Considered in Chafters 7-9 139
  • Appendix 5 Proportions of the Los Angeles Herakles, Lansdowne Herakles and Meleager (cf. Plates 31, 42 and 44) 147
  • Select Bibliography 149
  • Notes 152
  • General Index 177
  • Index of Sources 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.