Appendix 4
COPIES OF MAJOR WORKS
CONSIDERED IN CHAFTERS 7-9

ABBREVIATIONS:
D: H. Dütschke, Antike Bildwerke in Oberitalien ( 1874-82)
M: A. Michaelis, Ancient Marbles in Great Britain ( 1882)
MD: F. Matz and F. von Duhn, Antike Bildwerke in Rom ( 1881-82)
The name of a town signifies the chief collection in it; where the place name is omitted the collection is in Rome. The words 'stanza', 'sala' and 'galleria' are generally omitted. Restorations are not given unless misleading or incorrect; 'head alien' or statue alien' means that the head does not belong to the body or vice versa.
A. HERAKLES (LOS ANGELES--GENZANO TYPE)
PLATES 30-31,52Stands on left leg with right slightly relaxed. Pose unchiastic. Right arm lowered, hand holds club (lower end rests on ground); lion's skin draped over extended left forearm, left hand holds apples of Hesperides. Head beardless, turned to raised left shoulder, wreathed with white poplar. Hair bound with broad fillet descending to shoulders, locks parted over right eye; repeated pattern of short hookcurls over left forehead distinctive. Ht. of original, 1. 76 m.Variants: ivy or oak-leaf crown.Versions: stance altered (though remains unchiastic); hair style changed, once (A20) Romanised.Most of the copies are herms, where the turn of the head is varied to suit the intended position of the piece in the room.Copies collected and studied by B. Graef, RM 4 ( 1889), 189-216; A. Preyss, text to B-B 691-92 ( 1926); Mustilli, MusMuss, 80-81; Arias, 104-8; A. Linfert, Von Polyklet zu Lysipp (diss. Freiburg, 1966), 33-37, 71-75; S. Howard, The Lansdowne Herakles (J. Paul Getty Mus., Publication no. 1, 1966), 30-31. Neugebauer (text to B-B 717-18, 6) remarked upon the great divergences in the copies of the head, while Ashmole ( JHS 42 [ 1922], 241-45 figs. 6-8) believes Graef to have conflated two types, one Skopaic and one Praxitelean, and Stuart-Jones, PalCons, 90-92 considers the Conservatori herm (see Appendix to Chapter 7, section 4) to be a Dionysos. Thus, the following should be removed from the lists altogether:
(1) The Herakles Lansdowne and its replicas (E1-10). The deciding factors here are the hair style and great depth of the skull.
(2) The herm Mus. Cap. Nuovo Inv. 934, Helbig4 1731. Ashmole, loc. cit.; Graef 2; Preyss 6; Mustilli 1; Arias 6; Linfert Bb). Closely related to the Olympia Hermes and definitely Praxitelean. The dimple in the chin and hair style are distinctive; apparently the only copy of its type.
(3) The Conservatori herm (see above).
The hair styles of some of the 'versions' listed below also diverge markedly from the scheme described above, and it is possible that the type should be restricted even further.
I. Copies
1. Statue, Los Angeles 50.33.22. S. Reinach, RA 6 ( 1917), 460-61 fig. 1; Linfert Aa. PLATE 31a-c. For full bibliography, see note 7, Chapter 7. Antonine.
2. Torso, Cairo 27445. C. C. Edgar, Catalogue générale des antiquités égyptiennes du Musée du Caire iv pl. 4; Linfert Ab. Replica of Hellenistic copy?
3. Herm, London, BM 1731 (Genzano herm). Smith, BMCat iii pl. 5,2; Graef 7; Preyss 5; Mustilli 2; Arias 4 and pl. 2,6 (reversed) and 7; Linfert Ba. Hadrianic. PLATES 30, 52a-c.
4. Herm, Vatican Geografica 64. Helbig4 581; SVM iii.2, 490 and pl. 224; Graef 11; Preyss 8 and fig. 2; Mustilli 3; Arias 8; Linfert Bc. Poplar crown wrongly restored as ivy. Hadrianic.
5. Head (restored as herm), Pal. Corsini MD 138.

-139-

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Skopas of Paros
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations (at End) ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction: Methods of Approach 1
  • Part I: the Tegea Sculptures 5
  • Chapter One - Technique 39
  • Chapter Two - Composition 48
  • Chapter Three - Iconography and Interpretation 59
  • Chapter Four - Style 70
  • Chapter Five - Skopas in Tegea 80
  • Part Ii: Skopas 85
  • Chapter Six - Antecedents 85
  • Appendix 90
  • Chapter Eight Skopas in Asia 101
  • Chapter Nine Late Works 110
  • Part Iii: Documentation 126
  • Appendix 1 the Literary Sources 126
  • Notes 135
  • Appendix 2 Classical, Hellenistic and Roman Representations of the Calydonian Hunt 136
  • Appendix 3 the Arcadian Dynasty 138
  • Appendix 4 Copies of Major Works Considered in Chafters 7-9 139
  • Appendix 5 Proportions of the Los Angeles Herakles, Lansdowne Herakles and Meleager (cf. Plates 31, 42 and 44) 147
  • Select Bibliography 149
  • Notes 152
  • General Index 177
  • Index of Sources 183
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