The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814

By H. St. L. B. Moss | Go to book overview

DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIONS
I. 'The Sasanid triumph, assiduously placarded in rock-carving and fresco.' (page 7.)

Relief at Naksh-i-Rustam. Third century A.D. The Emperor Valerian kneeling before Shāpūr I. (Photograph by Professor Dr. Friedrich Sarre) Facing page7

II. a. Capitals from the crypt of St. Laurent, Grenoble' Sixth or seventh century. (Photograph, Archives Photo., Paris.)
The crude workmanship of these is as noticeable as the dependence on Roman and Byzantine models. Cf. R. de Lasteyrie, L'Architecture religieuse en France à l'époque romane, p. 101. ( Paris, 1912.)
b. Torhalle, Lorsch. Rhineland, eighth or ninth century. (Photograph, Staatliche Bildstelle, Berlin.)

This building, which appears to have formed the entrance porch to the atrium of the abbey church, has been assigned by most critics to the eighth or early ninth century. The elegant design and the successful assimilation of classical influences indicate the advance made by Frankish architecture at this period. R. de Lasteyrie (op. cit., pp. 167-70) is unable to accept it as being earlier than 1090, but it may reasonably be held that Carolingian work at Aix and elsewhere provides parallels for many of its features.

Facing page67

III. 'Eastern influence . . . with its stylized animal forms, its dark glowing jewels or glass cubes set in gold filigree.' (page 68.)
a. Plaque with animal-ornament in Scythian style from Ordos, N. Asia. Second century B.C.
b. Cloisonné jewellery of Gothic type from Kerch, Crimea. Fourth or fifth century A.D.
c. Cloisonné brooch from Lombardic grave, Belluno, N. Italy. Sixth century A.D.
d. Cloisonné brooch, probably from the Rhineland. Frankish, sixth century A.D.
e. Examples of early Anglo-Saxon animal-ornament from S.E. England. Sixth century A.D. (All from British Museum.)

This series is intended to illustrate the 'nomad influence' on the barbarian art of Europe--an influence which is also perceptible among the origins of the Byzantine style (cf. p. 88). The range of the 'animal-ornament' can be traced from the borders of China to the shores of England and Scandinavia, while the cloisonné technique acquired in the Crimean region--a corridor between Europe and Asia--is continued by the Teutonic invaders in their western homes. The sources and cross-currents of these streams of influence are still obscure. For further reference, cf. E. H. Minns, Scythians and Greeks ( Cambridge, 1925), M. Rostovtzeff, Iranians and Greeks in South Russia ( Oxford,

-xvi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Description of Illustrations xvi
  • Part I- Romans and Barbarians 1
  • I- The Roman World 1
  • II- The Barbarian World 38
  • III- The Clash of Cultures 57
  • Part II- The Triumph of Justinian 79
  • IV- Constantinople *
  • V- Justinian and the West 95
  • VI- Justinian and the East 108
  • VII- The Aftermath 125
  • Part III- The Onslaught of Islam 143
  • VIII- The Faith 143
  • IX- The Conquest 149
  • X- The Culture 159
  • Part IV- The Age of Charlemagne 175
  • XI- The European Background 175
  • XII- The Franks 193
  • XIII- The Papacy 222
  • Appendix A 266
  • Appendix B 270
  • Chronological Table 275
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 288
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.