The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814

By H. St. L. B. Moss | Go to book overview

IX
THE CONQUEST

RELIGION, as we have seen, had made possible the organization of Medina. This organization united the scattered Arabs in military conquest; out of this community grew a state. The key to the movement is to be found in the character of the immediate successors of Mahomet. His death was followed by a general rising in Arabia against the domination of Medina, and Islam seemed destined at this time to succumb before an overwhelming reaction of tribal feeling and particularist tendencies. The situation was saved by the strong and ruthless generals who led the Medinese forces against the peoples of Central Arabia; they, and not the contemplatives of Islam, directed the course of the movement. In swift and merciless campaigns they gained ascendancy over the whole peninsula, uniting the warring elements in a loose confederation, organized for aggressive action. But before the subjection of Arabia was complete, the earliest raids on Syria and Iraq, undertaken only with small forces, and with little idea of regular conquest, had carried all before them, and the overwhelming victories of the Yarmuk and Kadesíya1 had made it possible for the newly formed confederacy to avoid disruption by launching its masses upon the neighbouring territories. The time was ripe for such an adventure, and the nearest outlet for the surging forces was the land that lay immediately north of the peninsula, between the empires of Rome and Persia.

Neither power was in. a position to offer organized resistance. A period of anarchy in the Sasanid domains had followed the triumphs of Heraclius, and when order was finally restored, it came too late. The situation of the Roman Empire, apparently so brilliant, needs more explanation. Her victories had not only rendered Persia a defenceless victim; they had at the same time so weakened her own resources that in less than eight years all her newly regained territory in Syria and Egypt was lost to her. One important reason for this speedy reversal of fortune was the decadence of her military power. Long campaigns had spoilt

____________________
1
See p. 151.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Description of Illustrations xvi
  • Part I- Romans and Barbarians 1
  • I- The Roman World 1
  • II- The Barbarian World 38
  • III- The Clash of Cultures 57
  • Part II- The Triumph of Justinian 79
  • IV- Constantinople *
  • V- Justinian and the West 95
  • VI- Justinian and the East 108
  • VII- The Aftermath 125
  • Part III- The Onslaught of Islam 143
  • VIII- The Faith 143
  • IX- The Conquest 149
  • X- The Culture 159
  • Part IV- The Age of Charlemagne 175
  • XI- The European Background 175
  • XII- The Franks 193
  • XIII- The Papacy 222
  • Appendix A 266
  • Appendix B 270
  • Chronological Table 275
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 288
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.