FOREWORD

I LANDED in New York of June 1 after five months internment at Bad Nauheim. An Associated Press colleague slapped me on the back. "What about Germany?" he asked.

For the next thirty days that question, " What about Germany?" was repeated with increasing insistence. It was asked at luncheons, dinners, round-table conferences, and "bull session" huddles generously arranged by Kent Cooper of The Associated Press. More than that, Mr. Cooper himself suggested that I might take time off to write a book. It was his understanding, of course, that whatever I might write would be my own personal narrative, and that any opinions expressed would be mine, not to be construed as opinions of The Associated Press.

Still I hesitated. In the first place, the material which I was able to bring with me or had succeeded in smuggling out of Germany earlier was necessarily incomplete. By far the largest bulk of my collection of documents and revealing papers lies in a safe place in Germany where the Nazis will never get it. Secondly, I felt that I was still too close to events to write a dispassionate, objective story of my twenty-one years in Germany. In the third place, I had to assume that a copy of such a book would fall into Nazi hands -- in fact, I hope it will. I know the methods of Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, but I can face, with considerable equanimity, his efforts to discredit it.

There was a further important inhibition which I had: all my life I had been a man who believes in the peaceful adjustment of international relations. I opposed American's entry into the last war because I believed a bloodless solution might be found. Could I go back on my philosophy of life and join in the chorus to fight Hitlerism to its bitter end? In Germany I had made up my mind that Hitler understands but one language -- that of force. All my theories of an approach of reason, of appeasement, of conciliation proved impracticable in the face of the national socialist theory and practice of domination by brute might.

Week after week, month after month, it became clearer to me that there is no peaceful approach to international gangsterism, that there can be no peace and happiness neither in Germany itself nor in the world surrounding it until Adolf Hitler and his philosophy have been liquidated.

Since my return to America, conferences in Washington and New York, discussions with students of history and current events in various universities, reunions with fellow alumni from the University of Wisconsin, off-the-record talks before my fellow

-6-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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