ILLUSTRATIONS
Facing Page
Carl von Ossietzky, famous German writer and winner of the Nobel peace prize48
Goering shows his wedding presents to a group of foreign correspondents49
A trio of Nazi revolutionaries: Adolf Hitler, Hermann Goering, and the late Ernst Roehm64
Hitler has a Wagner complex and seldom misses a performance of "Die Meistersinger"65
German officers of the army and of the Nazi party triumphantly stride through the Arc de Triomphe96
Compiègne 1940 was a reversal of Compiègne 191897
Every night hundreds of tired, bedraggled returning Greek soldiers would lie down in the street112
Even the Acropolis of Athens assumed a martial air112
Whenever the Russians withdrew, they applied the "scorched earth" policy113
Member of a Russian "kolchos" or community farm113
High mountain passes from the Struma Valley of Yugoslavia to the Metaxas Line of Greece128
The Metaxas Line was a natural128
Field Marshal General von Reichenau talking to the Author (top). General Kurt von Briesen drove to the front lines in a side-car (lower)129
The "Siegfried Line," or "Westwall" as the Germans call it144
Reich's Labour Leader Robert Ley demands ever greater sacrifices of the workers145
Rudolf Hess, Hitler's Shadow176
Martin Niemoeller doughty fighter on behalf of the Protestant Church177
Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop announces to the foreign press that Germany has invaded Russia192
Goebbels tries to ooze charm as he answers a question put by the Author193

-10-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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