Hitler succeeded in imbuing each group with the idea that it, more than any other, was the corner-stone upon which the Nazi edifice rested.It must never be overlooked, in analysing the reasons for Hitler's rise to power, that he represented -- as Mussolini had done before him -- the arch-enemy of communism. There were many leaders of big business, even in the United States, who applauded his stand. Financiers in America, in England, and in France were willing to overlook the inhumanity and the injustices of the Nazi regime because, as they pointed out, Hitler was preventing the Bolsheviks from inundating Europe.
III. Preparing the Ground
AT another time and under different circumstances the Nazi party would merely have had a temporary flare-up followed by a sudden collapse, as other movements in Germany born of despair -- I cite especially the communist party -- had temporary influence when there was hard sledding in Germany, only to subside when conditions improved.But there were other factors which enabled Hitler in the decisive election of early March, 1933, to win 43 per cent, of the votes cast, with his temporary allies, the Hugenberg nationalists, carrying the other 8 per cent, to assure him a safe majority.Above all, there was the fertile soil prepared for the right seed. For Hitler's success can be measured only in terms of the conditions which he found at hand: six million unemployed: an economic depression which spread through the world and hit Germany -- which was still paying reparations -- particularly hard; a Republican Government so absorbed in fighting the depression that it lacked both the time and the imagination to devise an effective counter-propaganda against Nazism; a bureaucracy honeycombed with spies who reported every weakness in the republican regime from which Hitler could make political capital; a foreign world which failed to see anything but the queer antics of heel clicking, uniform wearing, beer-saloon fighting, epithet hurling, and rabble rousing by which the Hitler movement outwardly manifested itself.Three other considerations enter the picture as well:
1. The unsuspecting trustfulness of many leading exponents of the republican regime, and their failure to realise that, once in power, Hitler would never relinquish it.

-26-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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