More recently, since the war began, the German government has introduced a system of Eisernes Sparen (Iron Savings), by which the population can save money against the day of peace, in order then to have ready cash for purchasing all those consumers goods that are now lacking and that are promised in the event of certain victory.

Again we find a commendable social objective. That the real purpose of encouraging "iron savings" is that of supplying money to the government for the war is seen from the fact that the person who has such an account can, under no circumstances, touch it until the war is over. Thus the system is unlike the United States War Defence Bonds, which are redeemable earlier than on maturity. It stands to reason that the German government will not let the money thus paid in on "iron savings" accounts lie idle!

Not only were all these social objectives -- so loudly praised and laudable in themselves -- perverted to purposes of war; but the ideas themselves were, for the most part, taken over from already existing institutions of the short-lived democracy, and, in part, even from the imperial regime. A new name, a new dress, and an established idea became Hitler's idea.

As an example, Hitler's labour battalions had their forerunner in the former voluntary Labour Service of republican Germany, which was comparable to the American C.C.C. The "Strength Through Joy" movement had roots in the earlier Wandervogel (Birds of passage), which existed for much the same purpose.


IV: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped?

IT is obvious to us to-day that the German people, like the foreign powers, under-estimated Hitler and failed to grasp the significance of what was taking place. On December 27, 1932, I visited General Kurt von Schleicher, the soldier-politician who undermined Heinrich Bruening, placed Franz von Papen in the chancellorship and then unseated him, and finally became German chancellor himself, on December 3, 1932, only to yield to Adolf Hitler fifty-nine days later.

It was originally intended that the substance of our forty-five- minute talk would be used as an interview, but soon after my return to The Associated Press office, the General's secretary called to say the chancellor had thought it over and decided not to talk for publication now. An exact transcript of what we discussed is among my papers in Berlin.

-36-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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