A friend of mine was rounded up during the "purge" of June 30, 1934, because he had been an employee in the office of Von Papen who, although he had been vice-chancellor under Hitler, was at that time suspect to the Nazis. By some miracle my friend escaped execution by the firing squad and went to a concentration camp.

When he was released I scarcely recognised him. He looked ten years older. His hands shook so violently he could hardly hold a cigarette. When I asked what had happened, he exclaimed, "Please don't ask me. It was just too awful."

I never got his story, although we saw each other frequently during the next seven years. His brother once told me, "Please don't ask him. It excites him so to be reminded of those days in the concentration camp that his nerves get unstrung at each mention of that dreadful experience."

The German ambassador to one of the nations identified with the Axis came to Berlin for his periodic report to Hitler and Ribbentrop. After his formal audience, he had the courage to intervene on behalf of a theologian who had gone to college with him and who was now in a concentration camp.

Hitler expressed amazement. "Why, I was told he had been released," he said, obviously surprised. He assured the ambassador there would be no slip-up this time.

When the diplomat reached the Führer's outside office, a Gestapo official approached him and said curtly: "Remember that you are to discuss only the things that have been put down on the agenda. You took up a matter with our Führer which you were not authorised to talk about. That must never happen again. Mind your own business."

The Gestapo has its men in every government department. A friend of Dr. Schacht's, calling upon him one day, remarked that there was a new face in the outer office.

"Oh, don't you know him?" Schacht said nonchalantly. "That's the Gestapo officer who must watch me."


VI: The Nazis in Control

HAVING seized the government and, through the Gestapo, placed the opposition under lock and key, or at least terrorised it into inactivity, the Nazis next proceeded methodically to take control of all the innumerable clubs, societies, Vereine and other organisa-

-52-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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