Prince Louis Ferdinand, who realised that his family was being used to enhance Nazi prestige, was conspicuous by his absence.

Naturally, the news photographers were keen for a picture showing the first public social meeting of ex-royalty with the new powers-that-be in Germany. A representative of Joseph Goebbels, however, intervened and forbade not only the taking of pictures showing members of the former ruling houses, but all mention of their presence in accounts in the German press.

Goering insists that his wife be addressed and spoken of as Hohe Frau (Exalted Lady), a term usually applied to women of royal lineage. He desires that this former actress, who appears to be unassuming and natural, should appear in public wearing a different fur each time, and bedecking herself with different jewels, at each appearance in her theatre or opera box, or accompanied by nurse, butler, governess and secret service officer when she goes walking in a spa like Bad Gastein with her little daughter Edda. That is Goering's conception of representing the dignity of the Third Reich!


VIII: The Birds of Prey

WHEN Ernst Roehm, leader of the S.A. and Hitler's closest friend, was "purged" on June 30, 1934, the régime deemed it convenient to cite riotous living as one of the causes of his downfall. His successor, Victor Lutze, was presented to the nation as a homeloving man of plain tastes, who would insist upon frugality and simplicity among Hitler's brown-shirted storm troopers.

In an order of the day, dated July 1, 1934, and addressed to the S.A., Hitler said:

"I demand especially of the S.A. leader that he be an example of simplicity and not of luxury. I do not desire that the S.A. leader give expensive dinners, or even take part in such. People did not invite us formerly. We have now no reason to be there. Millions of oiir fellow citizens are minus the essentials of life even to-day. They are not jealous of those whom fortune has presented more. But it is unworthy of a national socialist, especially, to enlarge the gap between need and fortune which is extremely large as things stand, anyway."

Lutze, however, no sooner settled down in Berlin than we learned from friends of ours that the new S.A. chief had become their neighbour.

-69-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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