From this trip we returned without obtaining an answer to the question -- Why did Hitler not follow up Dunkirk and attempt to invade Great Britain? Suffice it here to remind the reader that prominent English military experts and publicists have frankly said that Hitler made a grave strategic blunder in not following up his success in Western Europe with an immediate invasion of England; that the British Isles were not prepared at that time for an attack, and his coup might then well have succeeded.

We cannot escape the conclusion: too late now!


XII: Lessons Learned from the Enemy

WISHFUL thinking will not win this war. The wise people who laughed indulgently and incredulously when, on landing from the Drottningholm, I asserted that Hitler was planning a gigantic offensive along the whole Russian front, are welcome to their mirth. I cannot find the situation at the date of writing so funny.

The military experts may tear me to pieces, if they will, and say that a layman has no business to draw lessons from chance observations. None the less, certain facts were driven home to me with impelling force; certain lessons were learned which should, I think, be known to the American people.

One: It is of vital importance that propaganda and military effort be minutely co-ordinated.

I learned this first great lesson before ever starting for a battle front. From the moment the war began, German propaganda was dovetailed into the war effort. No press release of any kind was issued without relation to what was going on in the military, political and economic factors of the German front.

For instance, long before any military objective was taken, the men in charge of propaganda had minute data prepared for release on the day of victory. Illuminating and informative material was available at the moment of capture on every city taken, every river or canal of importance crossed. The day Odessa fell, we correspondents were furnished with a complete dossier on the strategic and geographic position of this Black Sea port, its railway facilities, manufacturing capacity, freight and shipping turnover, industries, natural resources, racial composition of the population, and the like.

Another important role of carefully dovetailed propaganda was that of diverting enemy attention from the scene of an intended

-112-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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