six persons in uniform on the opposite side of the boundary -- and they were Belgian customs officials!

Another circumstance that amazed us was the fact that the French looked on calmly as the Germans recovered from their hastily evacuated cities one object of value to the war effort after another. Take, for example, that centre of Saar Valley industrial production, Saarbruecken. Normally a teeming, busy place of 69,000 inhabitants, with valuable steel and iron works, it was dead at the time of our visit. It had been evacuated. Signs on many shops read, "Evacuation of this business has been completed." Yet the French made no effort either to seize it or even to shell it.

With our military escorts I entered the dead city in full view of the French. Had they desired, the French could easily have picked us for easy marks. The German officers accompanying us made no effort to conceal their uniforms, indicating their high rank. Nothing happened. We were able to press forward to a street only one mile away from the French line.

The French also did nothing to prevent Saarbruecken industrial plants from carting away their valuable machinery as well as steel and ore reserves, carloads of copper wire and other essentials of war. Our German guides told us 200 freight cars were moving daily from Saarbruecken with materials and machinery of all sorts without the slightest interference by the French.

We also saw big trucks, loaded to the top, leaving across a bridge which the French might easily have destroyed. Yet not a shot had been fired at the city. We also saw dozens of families arriving with vehicles of every description and taking from their homes such valuables as they had failed to grab when the hurried evacuation orders first came.

The terrible awakening from the French came in the spring of 1940, when the Hitler war machine in an incredibly short time overran Holland and Belgium and forced France to her knees.


XIII: More Lessons from the Enemy

Six: Camouflage should not become stereotyped, but adapt itself to the local scenery, architecture, or terrain.

The stereotyped zigzag in green and brown and grey, so effectively used during World War I, was largely replaced by the Germans with something more modern.

-120-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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