of parachutists. Subordination is not, perhaps, the right word. For this particular operation a Luftwaffe field-marshal was given supreme responsibility. That meant he and his general staff had to work out the plan of operation and that the army, navy and air force had to carry out that plan.

According to colleagues who were on the other side at the time, and whose judgment I value, the fall of Crete was to be ascribed in part to the fact that Germany operated under a unified command, while on the British side there was a regrettable misunderstanding between the navy and the R.A.F.

During the months that followed we had occasion again and again to see that the idea of unified command worked favourably for Germany in Africa. From the moment Field Marshal Rommel was put in charge, it was up to him to say what air force support he needed to soften up Tobruk. It was up to him to say what the German and Italian navies were to do in the way of shelling Tobruk Harbour -- and win. All activity in Africa was co-ordinated because there was never any doubt as to who had the supreme command.

This lesson of the unified command, the most important of them all, which had impressed itself in geometrical progression as my visits to the front increased, became a burning conviction in Greece and has remained so ever since.


XIV: The Westwall

As this war is not likely to end until United Nations troops have crossed over to German soil, it may not be amiss to describe briefly the Westwall, although it is said to be lying idle at present. At the time of our visit in September, 1939, it was claimed that not more than one hundred persons had seen what we were permitted to view.

The fundamental idea underlying the construction of the West wall, or Siegfried Line, was that of diffusing rather than concentrating Germany's air-flung defence system, which in 1940 extended along a border of almost 375 miles, and reached from opposite Switzerland, past France, Belgium, and Luxemburg to Holland. I understand it now extends deep into France and far into Hollandy.

Hitler is said to have used a homely comparison in explaining

-132-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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