frontier, and from the Atlantic coast into the far Russian steppes.

Daily reports in the American press of trouble in Norway, in Holland, in Occupied France, in Yugoslavia, not to mention the sabotage and passive resistance going on in the Protectorate, in Poland, in former Austria, yes, even in Germany itself, all indicate that more and more men in uniform will be necessary to bolster up a system that is bound some day to totter, but that will cling ruthlessly to power, even though a bloody civil war follows.

Hitler has not yet solved the problem of getting enough ablebodied men. Every plant, every government office, and -- for the first time -- every Nazi party bureau is being combed with a fine tooth comb to discover more soldiers. The insatiable Führer has not yet found enough men to die for him. Inevitably, as time goes on, he will find fewer.


XVI: Hitler's Headaches

MORE and more, Hitler is becoming a bundle of nerves. And he has plenty of reason.

First and foremost is the fact that he has been unable to popularise the war which he declared on the United States. In all the other cases, it will be recalled, the official Nazi version was that the other side declared war ( Great Britain and France); or mobilised and prepared for an attack which could only be parried by quicker German action ( Poland and Soviet Russia); or had designs upon third coantries which necessitated Germany taking them under its protecting wing ( Denmark or Norway); or had plotted against the Reich while pretending to be neutral ( Holland and Belgium).

But in the case of the United States, Adolf Hitler assembled the Reichstag on December 11, 1941, and solemnly announced that the Reich was a belligerent enemy of America.

The declaration acted like a cold shower. It was as unexpected as it was ominous. Even in high circles nobody seriously thought Der Führer would go beyond an affirmation of solidarity with his Tripartite Pact partner, Emperor Hirohito. The most rabid Nazi expected merely a rupture of diplomatic relations.

"He's too smart for that," my barber told me; "he always lets the other fellow take the blame."

At our daily press conferences, Wilhelmstrasse spokesmen had

-149-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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