XVIII: The Relapse into Barbarism

WITH the inauguration of Hitler's New Order, there set in the most systematic, cruel, and lawless persecution of a race known in modern times.

The detailed story of this relapse into barbarism of a group of conscienceless adventurers who claim to be the custodians of the heritage of Goethe, Schiller, Mozart, Beethoven, Duerer, Holbein, Luther, Roswitha, Kant, Hegel, Roentgen, and Robert Koch is probably better known in the United States than anywhere else. The American correspondents in Germany were unceasing in their vigilance concerning new manifestations of anti-semitism. So blind were the Nazis in their hatred of the Jew that they had less objection to truthful reporting on anti-semitic measures and actions than on almost any other manifestation of Nazi-regimented German life.

The complete ousting of the Jew from all business in Germany represents a direct violation of a pledge given the business men of the world by the Nazi party, speaking through the mouth of Dr. Julius Lippert, mayor of Berlin, before the American Chamber of Commerce in Berlin on February 26, 1935. I know, for I was in the chair myself. This is what Lippert said:

"We are accused of destroying or intending to destroy all Jewish business life, but anyone looking around can see that Jewish business is not interfered with. If the Jew fulfils his civic duties, he will enjoy the same business rights as other citizens."

Not only has the Jew been barred from all commercial undertakings, but he is unable to go into a shop except during certain hours, and then only if there is no sign on the door saying, "We do not sell to Jews."

Nor is he the master of his own finances. Following the murder of German Embassy employee Ernst Vom Rath in Paris by a young man named Herschel Grynzpan in November, 1938, the cash reserves and a large part of the savings in stocks and bonds were taken from the Jews in the form of a one billion Reichsmark fine as collective atonement for the Paris deed. Whatever they still had left was put on blocked accounts, from which the owner can draw only enough for the bare necessities of life. The rest remains on deposit until the owner, some terrible night, is hauled off to Eastern Poland or the neighbourhood of Riga, after which it will be grabbed by the Nazis.

We shall never forget the orgy of synagogue burning, window smashing and store looting of November 9, 1938, when, on hearing of the Paris incident at Munich, Hitler in a rage gave the "go" sign for Nazis to do anything they pleased with the Jews.

-177-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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