refers to a story which appeared, after its sinking by a German submarine, of the luxurious Pacific liner Empress of Britain. The editors had taken pains to jibe at British plutocracy for building so palatial a vessel. They described the elegant appointments, intended for the idle rich. They drew a distorted picture of British plutocracy whiling away its time on the high seas on a ship which, if less expensive, might have served a social purpose.

The jibe proved a boomerang. Various Germans sent Goebbels and other high officials publicity booklets issued at great expense some years ago by the North-German Lloyd to show the German people what wonderful ships the Bremen and Europa were!

A Königsberg newspaper published a report on a lecture entitled "Frederick the Great as War Correspondent." Of all things, Frederick is here apostrophised as the inventor of atrocity propaganda.

Hitherto German writers had always credited the British and the Americans with being the first to inundate the world with so-called atrocity stories. It was stupid, in the eyes of Goebbels, for the East Prussian daily to place this stigma upon the very Frederick whom Hitler tries so hard to imitate and emulate.


XX: The Battle of Words

THROUGH the deliberate misuse of the written word, the German mass mind is skilfully prepared for future pronouncements, kept in the dark regarding many of the major happenings in the world, and given only a distorted picture of the rest.

The secret press instructions, which keep the newspapers at heel like whipped dogs, offer an astounding sidelight into the direction in which Germany is going, and her real intentions.

Here is a representative assortment of those in my collection:

November 14, 1940: A very regrettable mistake has been made by certain Berlin newspapers (Morgenpost, etc.), namely, the publication, on November 12, of the regulations covering meat inspection as they apply to the sale of dog meat. These were merely repetitions of an existing order of several years ago, and were re-issued at this time for definitely bureaucratic reasons. Certainly in this case a little judgment might have been used.

Thereby hangs a funny tale: between the hours of 1 a.m. and 8 a.m., one editor was regularly on duty in our Berlin Bureau of the Associated Press, not only to handle such "spot news" as might

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.