Editorials in the "Giornale d'Italia" directed against defeatist rumours and against rumours of disagreement between Italy and Germany are under no circumstances to be referred to.

In view of the contempt in which the Italians were generally held in Germany, one can well understand why Goebbels did not want the German people to know there were rumours of disagreement between the two countries.

Wait for the official version concerning the liberation of Chileans who were arrested in the occupied areas as a measure of reprisal.

This refers to certain Chilean nationals in France and Belgium who were seized when Germans in Chile were detained.

Surprise is expressed that the big papers this morning did not make more of the September figures regarding ship sinkings.

An interesting sidelight! Can it be that the editors don't believe Goebbels' claims of gigantic naval achievements any more?

Molotov, Harriman, and Beaverbrook on Thursday afternoon pilgrimaged to the tomb of Lenin, where they remained for several minutes in reverential silence. This should be duly emphasised.

Quickly forgetting that Hitler himself a year previously made a pact with the Soviets, Goebbels now instructed the press to editorialise upon the unholy alliance between British capitalism and Russian communism.

London lies about the military situation in the East (loss of Schlusselburg, ring around Leningrad broken twice) are to be made the subject of clever polemics.

German propaganda ever since the beginning of the war has tried to pick flaws in British military claims.

Dr. Goebbels is publishing an article in "Das Reich" entitled "Die Sache mit der Leickenpest," which deals with the handling of rumours current among the people. The male rumour mongers are referred to as "Herr Bransig," the female as "Frau Knöterich." These figures are not to be popularised generally. If, however, this theme is discussed, the use of these designations is permissible.

Here Goebbels invented names, just as American cartoonists invented Mr. and Mrs. Jiggs or Uncle Bim or Tillie the Toiler.


XXII: The War of Nerves

THE position of the German newsman under Nazi control was clear-cut. He printed what he was told. The situation of the foreign correspondents was different. Our job was both to get the news and to interpret it. To accomplish the former we faced

-218-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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