XXIV: Sugared Bread and the Whip

By different means, all leading to the same goal, a day-by-day attempt was made to turn the foreigner, notably the foreign correspondent, into an accomplice of Nazism.

Zuckerbrot und Peitsche is a term much used by the Nazis. It means, literally, "sugared bread and the whip." It is an apt designation for what the Nazis tried to do with the foreigner who was stationed within the Reich.

If he could be bought with Zuckerbrot, so much the better. Money was no object. It was always simpler to have a willing stooge than a recalcitrant opponent.

On the latter, the method of the Peitsche, the whip, was applied, not in the physical sense (except when he was actually taken to a concentration camp, which never happened, so far as I can remember, to an accredited foreign journalist), but in the spiritual sense of his being pilloried and tongue-lashed publicly.

What the Nazis overlooked was that many foreigners, in order to avoid trouble, remained silent and said nothing to indicate that they disagreed completely with what the Nazis were doing and saying. If I were to reveal to Herr Goebbels what many of my foreign colleagues in Berlin, whom his agents considered as won over to the Nazi cause, said in the seclusion of my study, he would probably be very surprised!

Ultra-friendliness, lavish hospitality, yes, even the direct bribe are favourite Nazi methods. They were applied not only to foreign correspondents. Any foreigner who was deemed susceptible or whose influence at home might be important was fair game for Joachim von Ribbentrop's special agents, versed in the art of acting as charming hosts.

Hospitality is a favourite form of indirect bribe with the Nazis. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

On January 20, 1941, the secret press instructions to the German newsmen informed them: "Knut Hamsun will arrive for a visit in Berlin and live in the private mansion, of Dr. Goebbels." Knut Hamsun swallowed the Nazi bait. While we were at Bad Nauheim. the German press on March 26, 1942, released a statement by the aged Norwegian novelist which out-Quislinged Quisling. He wrote in part:

" Roosevelt is President of the United States, and his people very likely think it devilishly clever of a chief of state simply to disregard the conventions of the more civilised Europe. He can afford to do so, for he is president of the big Yankee land. President Roosevelt doesn't need to know what is indispensable for

-234-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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