XXV: Fishing in Troubled Waters

JUST as the Propaganda Bureau never gave up its idea that by properly colouring the news, it could get the foreign correspondents to do its own work for them abroad, so, in dealing with foreign nations, the Nazis believed that by inculcating suspicions and distrust between nations, they could be made to react in a manner profitable to them.

Their tactics, in attempting to sow distrust and hostility between the United States and Latin America became increasingly apparent as time went on. The "softening up" of Latin Americans took place chiefly in the Ibero-American Institute, presided over by General Wilhelm Faupel, former ambassador to the Franco government of Spain. Its headquarters was located in the garish "Marstall," or imperial stables building of Wilhelm II's era. It contained reception-rooms, a huge library and offices for a whole staff of German experts on Latin-American questions. These experts were headed by the ubiquitous Frau Faupel. The Institute also had a whole corps of agents who, as the occasion demanded, discreetly distributed largesse.

The atmosphere in this Institute, which I had to visit occasionally to cover a story for our Central and South American papers, was distinctly anti-United States, though nobody in authority was ever willing to admit this. Proof of how its president stood came to me, however, in quite an unexpected manner on March 9, 1939.

There existed in Berlin an association known as Die Freunde der deuischen Akademie in München (Friends of the German Academy in Munich), whose main purpose was that of supporting the German Academy financially. Once a month the members lunched together at the Kaiserhof Hotel, and a prominent speaker addressed them.

For some reason or other -- I was not a member -- I had been placed on the mailing list, and received regular invitations to these luncheons. The programme for March 9, 1939, attracted me, as General Faupel was to speak on Latin America.

Faupel assumed that he was addressing Germans only. His speech was a tirade against the United States, and an admonition to the people of Latin America to beware of North America.

I cabled the essence of his remarks as follows for the afternoon papers of March 9:

"The Monroe Doctrine," I quoted him as saying, "is nothing but a claim put forward by the United States for domination of the Western Hemisphere. There is but one danger to Latin America -- that is the United States.

-244-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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