XXVIII: What Can Topple Hitler?
SOONER or later the United Nations are going to defeat Hitler and the Nazi system of life. But we won't do it until we understand clearly the elements of strength and weakness in the Hitler set-up and learn how, in the fastest and most expeditious manner, the scourge of Nazism may be made to disappear from the earth.In the course of my visits to the various "fronts" and while doing my daily press work in the capital of the Reich I had to learn necessarily certain lessons in regard to the German conduct of the war. It seems to me worth while to indicate here -- as I see them -- the concrete tasks that the United States and the United Nations are facing in their attempt to topple Hitler.
1. First and foremost, this is a total war and it can be won only by total measures. In Germany the entire resources of the Nazi Reich have been and are being poured into the single effort of winning the war. Privations which are unthinkable for most Americans, have been accepted grimly and fatalistically, by Hitler's subjects.

Are we willing to make sacrifices? For the present, I fear, we have not even begun to think of war in totalitarian terms. We complain when there is a petrol shortage -- the German long ago renounced not only his own car but even the privilege of driving in a taxi. We find it irksome that coffee consumption is being cut slightly -- the average German hardly remembers what real coffee is. We are distressed at the prospect of not having hot water all day -- the German knows he can have his warm bath only on Saturday or Sunday, and even then he must be sparing of water. I could multiply these instances.

If we go on living, unconcerned about the future, expecting that the comforts and amenities of life will continue for the civilian, and that discomfort and privation are the lot only of the men in combat areas, we may wake up with a jolt some day to find that our reserves -- however limitless they may seem now -- are exhausted, and that the German, possessing relatively far less food, clothing and consumers' goods than we, has by scientific rationing and placing the nation on a basis of total war from the first day in September, 1939, managed to outlast us.

I do not anticipate that our rich country will ever have to come down to the super-spartan simplicity of Teuton life in war-time. But by comparison with what I saw and experienced in Germany, and with what my colleagues stationed in England have repeatedly told me, we have not even begun to wage a total war.

-272-

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What about Germany?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Foreword 6
  • Contents 8
  • Illustrations 10
  • I: the Modern Genghis Khan 11
  • Ii: Why Hitler? 19
  • Iii. Preparing the Ground 26
  • Iv: Why Wasn't Hitler Stopped? 36
  • V: "Terror is a Wholesome Thing" 44
  • Vi: the Nazis in Control 52
  • Vii: Fat Years Follow the Lean 60
  • Viii: the Birds of Prey 69
  • Ix: Heil Hitler! 77
  • X: Der Führer in Person 84
  • Xi: Observing the War Machine in Action 96
  • Xii: Lessons Learned from the Enemy 112
  • Xiii: More Lessons from the Enemy 120
  • Xiv: the Westwall 132
  • Xv: Bottlenecks 138
  • Xvi: Hitler's Headaches 149
  • Xvii: is There Another Germany? 161
  • Xviii: the Relapse into Barbarism 177
  • Xix: the Secret Press Instructions 191
  • Xx: the Battle of Words 197
  • Xxi: Shaping a People's Mind 208
  • Xxii: the War of Nerves 218
  • Xxiii: the Foreign Press Gets into Trouble 226
  • Xxiv: Sugared Bread and the Whip 234
  • Xxv: Fishing in Troubled Waters 244
  • Xxvi: A Better Place to Live In 253
  • Xxvii: An Abrupt End to a Long Stay 262
  • Xxviii: What Can Topple Hitler? 272
  • Index 281
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