Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes

By W. J. Humphreys | Go to book overview

WEATHER PROVERBS AND PARADOXES

BY W. J. HUMPHREYS, Ph.D.

Meteorological Physicist, United States Weather Bureau; author of "Physics of the Air"

BALTIMORE

WILLIAMS & WILKINS COMPANY

1923

-i-

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Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Preface vii
  • Part I - Weather Proverbs 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Sun 8
  • The Green Ray 11
  • Sky Colors 14
  • Rainbow 33
  • Moon 36
  • Stars 40
  • Fogs 47
  • Clouds 50
  • Dew and Frost 54
  • Wind 56
  • Barometer 59
  • Thunder 66
  • St. Elmo's Fire 69
  • Odors 70
  • Springs and Wells 72
  • Hairs, Strings, and Other Things 73
  • Smoke 75
  • Plants 80
  • Birds and Beasts 81
  • Part II - Meteorological Paradoxes 85
  • Introduction 87
  • Air Pushed North Blows East 88
  • More Air Goes Up Than Ever Comes Down 91
  • To Cool Air, Heat It 92
  • To Warm Air, Cool It 94
  • Not Air That is Heated, but Air That is Not Heated, is Thereby Warmed 97
  • Not Air That is Chilled, but Air That is Not Chilled, is Thereby Cooled 99
  • Mixing Brings the Air to a Non- Uniform Temperature 101
  • The Nearer the Sun, the Colder the Air 103
  • As the Days Grow Longer, the Cold Grows Stronger 105
  • As the Nights Grow Longer, the Heat Grows Stronger 112
  • As the Sun Descends, the Temperature Ascends 113
  • When a Thaw Comes On, the Frost Goes Down 114
  • The Cooler the Sun, the Warmer the Earth 121
  • The Closer the Sun, the Colder the Season 121
  • The Sun Rises Before It is Up 122
  • The Sun Sets After It is Down 123
  • Sans Tache 127
  • Authoritative Books 130
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