Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends

By Mark W. Scerbo | Go to book overview

Does Desire for Control Affect Interactions in an Adaptive Automated Environment?

Cristina Bubb-Lewis Lucent Technologies

Mark W. Scerbo Old Dominion University


INTRODUCTION

Adaptive automation refers to dynamic systems which adjust their methods of operation in response to changes in situational demands ( Rouse, 1988). In an adaptive automation system, the human and the machine must work together as partners in order to maintain optimal operation of the system ( Scerbo, 1994). Because of the close relationship between the human and the system, it seems reasonable that human- machine communication would be critical to adaptive automation. Thus, one goal of the present study was to examine the effects of different communication patterns on performance with an adaptive task.


DESIRE FOR CONTROL

Desirability for Control (DC) refers to one's need to control the environment ( Burger and Cooper, 1979). High DC people are described as decisive, assertive, and active while low DC people are described as nonassertive, passive, and indecisive. High-DC participants have been shown to display higher levels of aspiration, have higher expectancies for their performance, and set more realistic expectations than low-DC participants ( Burger, 1985). In addition, high-DC participants respond to a challenging task with more effort, persist longer, and perform better than low-DC participants.

Although DC has not been studied with regard to team dynamics, it seems to be relevant. A high-DC person might be less willing to act as a team member in solving problems because of their need to control situations. On the other hand, a low-DC person might rely too heavily on their partner. Either of these effects within a team could have a detrimental impact on the efficiency of the interaction, and consequently could affect human-computer interaction in adaptive automation in a similar manner.


PRESENT STUDY

The current study used a Wizard-of-Oz simulation ( Gould, Conti, & Hovanyecz, 1983) to study the effects of communication mode, task complexity, and desire for control on performance with an adaptive task. The focus of this paper will be on the DC results.

The simulation involved a"talking" adaptive computer that helped participants complete computer tasks. Four modes of communication were used that differed in the level of restriction placed on communication between the participant and computer. Two levels of task complexity were used with all participants completing both simple and complex tasks. DC was measured and participants were split into high-DC and low-DC groups for analysis. Dependent measures included task score as well as responses on a participant questionnaire

It was hypothesized that as more restrictions were placed on communication, performance would decrease and computer control would increase. Also, restricting communication was expected to make the interaction less efficient and make it more difficult for participants to complete the tasks, thereby leading to lower scores and increased computer intervention. Task scores were also expected to be higher for simple

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.