Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends

By Mark W. Scerbo | Go to book overview

The Development of an Automated Monitoring System Interface Associated with Aircraft Condition
John E. Deaton and Floyd Glenn CHI Systems, Inc.
INTRODUCTION
The work to be described here concerns initial efforts to develop aircrew interfaces for mechanical fault information that will be provided from advanced sensors and processors. The ultimate goal of this program is to build an aircrew interface that optimally aids the aircrew in managing in-flight mechanical emergencies. The approach adopted by the current researchers to develop the aircrew interface is to sequence through the following paradigm:
Identify information and control needs of aircrew for optimal fault management,
Identify all relevant information that can be supplied by the best available sensors and signal processors, and then
Build the intelligent interface system that forges the gap between the information and control needs and the information that can be supplied by sensors and signal processors by applying appropriate information processing technology.

The key to a successful implementation of mechanical diagnostic capabilities within the aircraft crew-station environment is effectively integrating and presenting the information derived from these sensors in a manner that is timely, useful, and readily interpretable by the aircrew. To accomplish this task, a better understanding of the demands required for aircrew to perform within the aircraft environment is a necessity. In other words, the aircrew interface design problem consists of determining what information to present to the aircrew and how to present it.

In order to determine what information should be presented to the aircrew, it is necessary to establish both what information the aircrew needs and wants and also what information can feasiblely be generated to satisfy their needs/desires. Since essentially none of the currently generated advanced sensor outputs are suitable for aircrew presentation due to the complexity of interpretation required, this process is expected to warrant iterative refinement. As a starting point, it is important to identify the general types of information that the aircrew needs, then try to characterize the kinds of information that can be generated in the identified categories. Next, one must assess the utility to the aircrew of those specific kinds of information, etc. It is assumed that all information that might be presented to the aircrew would have to be generated via some kind of aiding algorithm which would use advanced sensor data as its primary input. Such algorithms could vary from extremely simple ones like current chip detector lights which just indicate that some anomaly has been detected, to very sophisticated algorithms which would tell the aircrew precisely what to do to respond optimally to the detected problem.

Advanced mechanical diagnostic technologies are emerging from the Navy scientific and technology community that soon will allow both advanced ground-based diagnostics and mobile data access and onboard real-time processing of data to accurately determine the health of aircraft mechanical systems (summary reviews of this new technology are available in Stevens, Hall, & Smith, 1996; Parry, 1996; Marsh, 1996, and Nickerson, 1994). Through the use of a combination of sensors, software, and displays, it is now possible to track component wear and fatigue trends, monitor for conditions that indicate impending failure, and alert the aircrew. Furthermore, this tracking and monitoring capability will allow accelerated wear and fatigue trends to be identified, so that the aircraft can be flown within its design parameters.

This new diagnostic technology, sometimes called HUMS (Health and Usage Monitoring Systems), has been used by both UK and Norwegian operators during helicopter ferrying services to North Sea oil platforms. Through implementation of this capability in North Sea operations, improvements in flight safety have been realized ( Chamberlain, 1994). HUMS systems have allowed detailed views of rotor system track

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.