Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends

By Mark W. Scerbo | Go to book overview

Injury Reduction Ergonomics in the Development of an Automated Squeezer Molder Line in a Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Facility
Angela Galinsky, University of South Dakota Carryl Baldwin, Western Iowa Technical Community College T. Dell, Joanne Benedetto, J. Berkhout, University of South Dakota
INTRODUCTION
In the course of a company-wide ergonomic evaluation of workstations, three squeezer-molder stations in the casting division of the foundry were found to generate an unacceptably high rate of musculoskeletal injuries. OSHA 200 logs for these workstations provided documentation of strains, tears and back injuries dating back to 1981.We conducted a detailed inventory of all discrete operator tasks performed at these stations. Each task was further analyzed for its effect on operator safety, productivity, machine integrity, and for the derivation of design requirements for possible automation of the squeezer-molder stations.Extensive automation of these workstations was determined to be the most cost-effective way of reducing the physical hazards to the operators.This foundry produces gray and ductile iron castings of up to 1,500 pounds. Approximately 150 employees work in the casting facility. Most of the workstations require considerable physical effort. Forklifts move pallets of molds, cores and castings. An overhead conveyor moves crucibles of molten metal. Other lifts and displacements are human powered, some using wheeled carts.The company is known for its low scrap rate (less than 2%), and its aggressive quality control procedures. The company has an active safety committee, and its safety policies and procedures are well documented and implemented.
Ergonomic hazard inventory
Seventeen years of accident records were reviewed. Workstations were flagged for extensive analysis if they met any of the following tests:
a frequency of accidents above norms for the metal working industry;
any severe accidents involving lost time;
any injuries related to repetitive stress or chronic musculoskeletal disorders;
any upper extremity disorders;
any accidents suggesting the presence of noxious environmental conditions.

Minor injuries tended to occur to the most recent hires, while serious injuries were distributed among employees without regard to tenure. This suggests that experience reduced exposure to minor injuries, but that major workstation changes would be needed to reduce the more serious incidents.

Tables 1 and 2 below are excerpted from Dell and Berkhout ( 1998), who published an extensive review of injuries by work category at this same metal working facility.

One startling statistic is that less than one-fourth of all the molders working at the three sand mold stations escaped injury. This was due to their low turnover rate and long tenure at the shop, as well as the nature of the tasks they performed.

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Automation Technology and Human Performance: Current Research and Trends
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.