Chapter 14
THE ECONOMICS OF RACIALISM

Europeans, when faced with the ravenous African demand for political power, will say "let them have bread."

There is a widespread feeling among the white settlers that what Africans really need and want is bread, not votes: economic and not political advancement.

As an analysis of current political feeling among Africans, this is not correct. There is a widespread disdain for economic benefits as embodied in Federation and a demand for political advancement and "liberty" at whatever material cost. This is not to say, however, that a substantial development towards economic partnership might not diminish the Drang nach Politik. Very much of the political pressure in central Africa (and, indeed, anywhere else) derives its force from economic frustration and the concomitant belief that only through political control can the economically underprivileged effect redress.

Certainly it is a theory worth testing that rapid economic progress for the African can forestall a political debacle for the Europeans. Present economic policies in the Federation do not, however, indicate much greater enthusiasm on the part of many Europeans for African economic than for African political advancement, and in the midst of a substantial boom, the Federation faces a problem of African economic retardation which only the most genuine and imaginative enthusiasm can possibly overcome.


a) The Problem--Racial Gap in Economic Stratification

Despite a slackening in the pace of development which became apparent towards the end of 1957, the economic growth of the Federation has been remarkable. Salisbury in transition looks like a double exposure of midtown Manhattan and Dead Man's Gulch. Corrugated iron

-273-

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