Oral Traditions of Anuta: A Polynesian Outlier in the Solomon Islands

By Richard Feinberg | Go to book overview

Seven
Extermination of Anuta's Population and
the Origin of the Four 'Clans'1

Text 13
Slaughter of the Island's Population
[Narrated by Pu Nukumarere
with the assistance of Pu Tokerau]

Ko Pu Pongi ne ariki. Kairo e araarapanga o te vaatia o Pu Pongi ne ariki i ei.

Ko te tama a Pu Pongi, ko Pu Tingirau. Pu Pongi ne mate. Tana tama, ko Pu Tingirau, ne ariki.

Ko Pu Tingirau ne taute ana tama e toko toru. Te urumatua, ko te papine, Tautorona, Nau Ariki. Na rua, ko Tearakura, Tui Anuta. Na toru, Pu Tepuko, Kavekau. Take mea, Tauvakatai. Te pakaoti, Nau Pangatau, Nanati.

Ko Pu Tingirau ne aru ki Tikopia. Ko ia ne noponopo i Tikopia. Ko ia ne maanatu ke au ki te penua nei. Ko ia ne au i na vaka. Maatea na kapikapi nga vaka mai Tikopia. Nga vaka mai Tikopia mo te vaka o te ariki, ko naatou ne o mai, pakatuu ra. Ko te matangi e maatea na makeke. Ko naatou ne o mai. Poouri te penua i te moana. Take vaka, ko Pu Rangitita ne au i ei. Naaua mo Pu Komota. Ne karanga

Pu Pongi became chief. There is no story of the time when Pu Pongi was chief.

Pu Pongi's son was Pu Tingirau. Pu Pongi died. His son, Pu Tingirau, became chief. 2

Pu Tingirau produced his three children. 3 The eldest, a female, was Tautorona, Nau Ariki. 4 The second was Tearakura, Tui Anuta. The third was Pu Tepuko, Kavekau. Another one was Tauvakatai. The last was Nau Pangatau, Nanati.

Pu Tingirau went to Tikopia. He dwelt on Tikopia. He thought about returning to this island. He came in his canoe. Great in number were the canoes from Tikopia. The canoes from Tikopia and the chief's canoe, they came under raised sails. The wind was very strong. They came this way. Night fell on the ocean. Pu Rangitita came in one canoe. The two of them, he and Pu Komota. He said to furl the sail. He spoke

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