Selected Papers of Homer Cummings, Attorney General of the United States, 1933-1939

By Homer S. Cummings; Carl Brent Swisher | Go to book overview

6. Enforcement Training
Police training under way; from "Progress Toward a Modern Administration of Criminal Justice in the United States," an address at the Annual Meeting of The North Carolina Confer­ ence for Social Service, April 27, 1936:

WITH respect to the practical recommendations of the Crime Conference of 1934, time does not permit me to offer a discussion, except to state that one of the important actions taken was that approving the establishment at Washingon, D. C., of a scientific and educational center to provide national leadership in the broad field of criminal law administration and the treatment of crime and criminals. The Advisory Committee appointed to consider this recommendation approved the creation of the proposed center within the structure of the Department of Justice, and it was decided to use the existing facilities of the Department for this purpose.

For several years, under the guidance of its skilled Director, Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, there had been in successful operation in the Federal Bureau of Investigation an excellent training school for the instruction of special agents. * * * It was decided to make that training course, with suitable adaptations, available to selected law enforcement officials throughout the United States.

The first Police Training School was held in the summer of 1935, and a second group of law enforcement officers was graduated a short time ago. Plant, technical equipment, scientific facilities, lecturers, and instructors are made available for this important work. The sole expense to those who take these courses is the cost of transportation to and from Washington, and of personal maintenance during the period of instruction. The Department cannot, of course, offer these advantages indiscriminately, but it can and does undertake to supply to a limited number of experienced police officials instruction in all of the manifold scientific and technical subjects in which special agents of the Federal

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selected Papers of Homer Cummings, Attorney General of the United States, 1933-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.