Selected Papers of Homer Cummings, Attorney General of the United States, 1933-1939

By Homer S. Cummings; Carl Brent Swisher | Go to book overview

II. Changing Personnel

[During the calendar year 1936 alone, there were 7,896 personnel changes in the resident and field staff of the Department of Justice and 1,764 in the staff of the judiciary, a total of 9,660 upon which the Attorney General was required to act. Two thousand of these were new appointments. Some sixty thousand such changes occurred between 1933 and 1939. They include appointments, transfers, resignations, cancellations, suspensions, terminations, leaves without pay, and increases and reductions of salary affecting the executive offices and their staffs, United States attorneys and marshals and their assistants, judges' clerks, law clerks, and commissioners. Attorney General Cummings discussed, briefly, some of the aspects of this function in the statement included above in Section 2 of Part One. Ed.]


Correspondence with Senator T. J. Walsh, Attorney General designate:

February 22, 1933

Dear Homer: Giving some thought to the organization of my force in the Department of Justice, I should very much like to have you take the place of [the] Assistant who handles all patronage matters, appointments of judges, district attorneys, marshals, and other officers of like character. Your experience as a practitioner in the conduct of important lawsuits, as well as your familiarity with the country at large, fits you, as I think, peculiarly for the place.

February 24, 1933

Dear Friend Walsh: It was very gracious of you to tender so important a place in the Department of Justice. *** It just so happens, however, that Governor Roosevelt has tendered me the appointment as Governor General of the Philippine Islands and I have indicated to him my willingness to accept. This, of course, makes it impossible for me to accept your very flattering invitation.

-279-

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