Design for the Stage: First Steps

By Darwin Reid Payne | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

No book is ever the sole accomplishment of a single person. Certainly many people have aided in preparing this one. And yet, out of that number, two have been particularly thoughtful in their advice. In the manuscript stage, Dr. Archibald McLeod made many valuable suggestions which have been incorporated into the final text. A special thanks must be paid to Mordecai Gorelik for his many years of helpful counsel as well as the useful example of his own work; his philosophy of what constitutes that very special art of scene design certainly informs much of what is presented in the following pages. Lastly, I would like to express my great appreciation for the photographic work of Bob Jones whose great skill I have often relied upon both in the preparation of this book as well as in past projects.

Special acknowledgment is made to the following publishers and copyright holders to quote from their works:

A number of statements by Arthur Miller from The Ideal Theater: Eight Concepts have been reprinted with the permission of The American Federation of Arts which has the copyright.

Portion of a letter reprinted from To Directors and Actors: Letters, 1948- 1959, by Michel de Ghelderode, translated by Bettina Knapp. First published in the Tulane Drama Review, Summer 1965. Reprinted by permission of Bettina Knapp .

The entire article, "The Building or the Theater," by Sean Kenny, from Theatre Crafts 2, no. 1 ( January-February 1968). Reprinted by permission of Theatre Crafts.

"Practical Dreams," by Jo Mielziner, in Ralph Pendleton, The Theater of Robert Edmond Jones (Middleton, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1958). Reprinted by permission of Wesleyan University Press.

Art and the Stage in the Twentieth Century, by Henning Rischbieter. Reprinted by permission of the New York Graphic Society, Greenwich, Conn.

"On Being Upstaged by Scenery," by Robert Hatch. © Copyright 1962 by American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc. Reprinted by permission from Horizon, September 1962.

-xiii-

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