Time, Science, and Society in China and the West

By J. T. Fraser; N. Lawrence et al. | Go to book overview

Constitution and By-Laws of the International Society for the Study of Time

(Adopted at Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1 September 1974, amended at Alpbach, Austria, 9 July 1979, and at Castello di Gargonza, Italy, 9 July 1983).


PREAMBLE

The International Society for the Study of Time originated in a proposal by J. T. Fraser that was discussed at a conference on "Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Time" held by the New York Academy of Sciences in January 1966. It was unanimously agreed that an international society should be formed on an interdisciplinary basis with the object of stimulating interest in all problems concerning time and that this object could best be obtained by means of conferences held at regular intervals. G. J. Whitrow was elected President, J. T. Fraser Secretary, and M. S. Watanabe Treasurer. It was agreed that the organization of the First Conference of the newly formed Society be left to a committee of these three officers, on the understanding that they would invite authorities on the role of time in the various special sciences and humanities to form an Advisory Board to assist them.


CONSTITUTION

Article I--Name

The name of the Society shall be the "International Society for the Study of Time."

Article II--Object

The object of the Society shall be to encourage the interdisciplinary study of time in all its aspects. This object is to be achieved through the dissemination of information, especially by (a) the organization of conferences, (b) publication of selected papers from those conferences, and (c) any other means that further the goals of the Society.

Article III--Membership

All those who have been invited and have prepared papers to deliver to the Society at one of its conferences (even if circumstances have prevented the address from being delivered) will be invited to become Members of the Society.

Article IV--Corresponding Members

Those who wish to join the Society but have not qualified for Membership under Article III of the Constitution may be Corresponding Members on approval by the Council.

Article V--The Council

The Council shall be the legal authority of the Society and this capacity shall have and hold all its property and funds. It shall be responsible for its budget, shall form the Society's general policies, and shall assist the Officers in arranging for meetings, publications, financial support, and other similar activities. It is to be consulted by the Conference Committee on the general organization of confer-

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