influence of Du Bellay Deffence et Illustration, which was accepted as the authoritative manifesto of the new movement in French poetry. However, Du Bellay was more personal than partisan and, in spite of his Deffence, not the most representative member of the group to which he belonged. It was his rich vein of romantic sentiment that must have attracted the youthful Spenser. However early and imperfect the translations, they show a significant tendency in the development of the poet's taste, which was catholic enough to relish poets so strikingly dissimilar as Du Bellay and Marot.
REFERENCES
Koeppel E. Ueber die Echtheit der Edmund Spenser Zugeschriebenen "Visions of Petrarch" und "Visions of Bellay. Englische Studien, XV ( 1891), 74 ff.

-110-

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A Spenser Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - The Age of Spenser 1
  • References 15
  • Chapter II - The Life of Spenser 17
  • References 37
  • Chapter III - The Shepheardes Calender 39
  • References 71
  • Chapter IV - Complaints 73
  • References 77
  • Chapter V - The Ruines of Time 79
  • Chapter VI - The Teares of the Muses 86
  • References 93
  • Chapter VII - Virgils Gnat 94
  • References 98
  • Chapter VIII - Mother Hubberds Tale 99
  • References 105
  • Chapter IX The Ruines of Rome 107
  • References 110
  • Chapter X - Muiopotmos 111
  • References 117
  • Chapter XI - Visions of the Worlds Vanitie 118
  • References 119
  • Chapter XII - The Visions of Bellay and the Visions Of Petrarch Formerly Translated 120
  • References 125
  • Chapter XIII - The Faerie Queene 126
  • References 146
  • Chapter XIV - The Faerie Queene, Book I 150
  • Chapter XV - The Faerie Queene, Book II 172
  • References 208
  • Chapter XVI - The Faerie Queene, Book III 210
  • Chapter XVII - The Faerie Queene, Book IV 231
  • References 247
  • Chapter XVIII - The Faerie Queene, Book V 249
  • References 277
  • Chapter XIX - The Faerie Queene, Book VI 278
  • References 299
  • Chapter XX - The Faerie Queene, Mutabilitie Cantos 301
  • References 312
  • Chapter XXI - Daphnaïda 314
  • References 320
  • Chapter XXII - Colin Clouts Come Home Againe 321
  • References 328
  • Chapter XXIII - Astrophel 329
  • References 332
  • Chapter XXIV - The Doleful Lay of Clorinda 333
  • References 334
  • Chapter XXV - Amoretti 335
  • References 347
  • Chapter XXVI - The Anacreontics 348
  • References 350
  • Chapter XXVII - Epithalamion 351
  • References 356
  • References 369
  • Chapter XXIX - Prothalamion 371
  • References 376
  • Chapter XXX - A View of the Present State Of Ireland 377
  • Chapter XXXI - Letters 388
  • Chapter XXXII - Language and Versification 394
  • Appendix 406
  • References 410
  • Index 411
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