Dialogues concerning Two New Sciences

By Galileo Galilei; Henry Crew et al. | Go to book overview

FIRST DAY

INTERLOCUTORS: SALVIATI, SAGREDO AND SIMPLICIO

SALV. The constant activity which you Venetians display in your famous arsenal suggests to the studious mind a large field for investigation, especially that part of the work which involves mechanics; for in this department all types of instruments and machines are constantly being constructed by many artisans, among whom there must be some who, partly by inherited experience and partly by their own observations, have become highly expert and clever in explanation.

SAGR. You are quite right. Indeed, I myself, being curious by nature, frequently visit this place for the mere pleasure of observing the work of those who, on account of their superiority over other artisans, we call "first rank men." Conference with them has often helped me in the investigation of certain effects including not only those which are striking, but also those which are recondite and almost incredible. At times also I have been put to confusion and driven to despair of ever explaining something for which I could not account, but which my senses told me to be true. And notwithstanding the fact that what the old man told us a little while ago is proverbial and commonly accepted, yet it seemed to me altogether false, like many another saying which is current among the ignorant; for I think they introduce these expressions in order to give the appearance of knowing something about matters which they do not understand. Salv.

-1-

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Dialogues concerning Two New Sciences
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Translators' Preface v
  • Introduction ix
  • [43] - To the Most Illustrious Lord Count of Noailles xvii
  • The Publisher to the Reader xix
  • Table of Contents *
  • First Day 1
  • Second Day 109
  • Third Day 153
  • Fourth Day 244
  • Appendix 295
  • Index 297
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