Popular Astronomy: Being the New Descriptive Astronomy

By Joel Dorman Steele | Go to book overview

SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS

THIS work is designed to be recited in the topical method. On hearing the title of a paragraph, the pupil should be able to draw upon the blackboard the diagram, and to state in substance what is contained in the book. It will be noticed that the order of topics, in treating of the planets and also of the constellations, is uniform. If, each day, a portion of the class write their topics in full upon the blackboard, it will be found a valuable exercise in spelling, punctuation, and composition. Every point which can be illustrated in the heavens should be shown to the class. No description or apparatus can equal the reality in the sky. After a constellation has been traced, the pupil should practice star-map drawing.

The section on 'Celestial Measurements,' near the close of the work, should be constantly referred to during the term. In the figures, and especially in the star maps, it should be remembered that the right-hand side represents the west; and the left-hand the east. To obtain this idea correctly, the book should in general be held up toward the southern sky.

For the purpose of more easily finding the heavenly bodies at any time, a planisphere, either Poole's, Harrington's, or Goldthwaite's, is of great service. A small telescope, or even an opera glass, will be useful. A good star map, and as many advanced works upon astronomy as can be secured, should be included in the teacher's outfit.

The pupil should, at the outset, get a distinct idea of the circles and planes of the celestial sphere. The subject of angular measurements can easily be made clear in this relation. A circle contains 360°; 90° reach from horizon to zenith; 180° produce opposition; while smaller distances can be shown in the sky (see pp. 226, 238).

-7-

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Popular Astronomy: Being the New Descriptive Astronomy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • Suggestions to Teachers 7
  • Reading References 8
  • Table of Contents 9
  • The Study of Astronomy 11
  • I- Introduction 13
  • II- The Solar System 43
  • Introduction 45
  • III- The Sidereal System 211
  • IV- Appendix 305
  • Index 345
  • Scientific Memoir Series 350
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