Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

I. Matching Men to Job Requirements*
Harold F. RotheIN ALL PSYCHOLOGICAL evaluations of personal characteristics and their relation to jobs, the first step is to obtain an accurate picture of the job in question, namely a job description. From the psychologist's point of view, many job descriptions, at least of supervisory jobs, suffer because of the non-specific and non-operational definitions. What meaning can a psychologist attach to such descriptions as: "Responsible to the General Manager for the following functions"; "Supervises the work of Department 12"; "Responsible for personnel and costs"; etc.? After reading such descriptions one may readily raise the question, "Just what does he do?"Detailed interviews with many hundreds of supervisors led to the establishment of six basic operations, or clusters of operations, that an industrial leader performs. These are in approximate chronological order:
1. plans an activity,
2. decides to do, or not to do, a certain thing,
3. organizes a group of persons to carry out the plans that have been decided upon,
4. communicates the program to the organization,
5. leads the organization toward the established goal, and
6. analyzes the progress toward the goal.
These six operations are, if course, not as specific and rigorous as an experimental psychologist would desire. On the other hand they have the advantages of being common to many industrial and even non- industrial leadership positions, and also of being readily further refined into more specific operations. The key to the entire technique described here lies in the breakdown of these six clusters into their components.It is interesting to note that other writers have developed essentially the same operations. Flanagan1 has described an evaluation system in which "critical incidents" of leadership behavior are classified in six areas:
1. proficiency in handling administrative detail,
2. proficiency in supervising personnel,
3. proficiency in planning and directing action,
4. proficiency in (military) occupational specialty,
____________________
*
From Personnel Psychology, Vol. 4, 1951, pp. 291-301.
1
J. C. Flanagan, "A New Approach to Evaluating Personnel," Personnel, Vol. 26, 1949, pp. 35-42.

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 638

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.