Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

sonnel. Without a technique of this kind a psychologist must use a rather vague opinion about job requirements and then recommend, or not recommend, a person for a job based upon that concept of the job. In many instances the psychologist's evaluation of a man, using test norms for various kinds of workers, is far more refined than is his concept of the job the man holds, or will hold.

Thus a psychologist may test and interview an applicant for a position as purchasing agent. On an intelligence test, for example, he may have available only norms for the general population. If his techniques are more refined he will have norms for purchasing agents. Suppose now that this applicant is slightly below the average purchasing agent in intelligence. Is he, or is he not, recommended for that position?

The answer to this question obviously lies in knowing how much intelligence (or any other ability) the specific job requires. Norms of people are not enough. Norms of jobs must be developed. This means that jobs must be analyzed into operating aspects and these aspects must be quantified. A technique such as the one described in this article does do just that.


2. What Job Applicants Look for in a Company*

Clifford E. Jurgensen

ALL OF US HAVE heard persons say, "Company X is the best company to work for in the whole state." Similarly, we have heard persons say "I wouldn't work for company Y if it were the last place on earth." Applicants frequently state in their interview for employment, "I would like a job here because everyone says it's a good place to work." These opinions which people have toward any company are important to that company, and are particularly important in the case of a public utility. They do much to establish and maintain good or poor public relations; and they make it easy or hard to build up an adequate pool of job applicants from which to select satisfactory employees.

What are the factors by which persons decide whether a job is a "good" job or a company is a "good" company? Discussion with executives, supervisors, union officials, employees, and job applicants frequently emphasizes the importance of the following ten factors:

____________________
*
From Personnel, Vol. 25, 1949, pp. 352-55.

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