Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

appear that the point of diminishing returns has been reached and that time might more profitably be devoted to factors currently considered more important by the average job applicant. Unions seem to be currently overemphasizing these factors on the basis of what workers wanted a generation ago rather than what they want today.

Benefits were relegated by job applicants to the last position. It would thus appear worthwhile for management and unions to review reasons for emphasizing benefits. There certainly is no justification for emphasizing benefits on the basis of the desires of job applicants, although emphasis may be warranted by employee need or other conditions.

In conclusion, too much emphasis has often been given factors which, according to this study, are considered relatively unimportant by applicants. There would seem to be an excellent opportunity to devise principles and procedures that would result in greater job satisfaction on the part of employees, and consequently in improved quality of work, increased quantity of output, and lower costs.


3. Validating the Patterned Interview*

Robert N. McMurry

DURING RECENT years several studies have been conducted on the value of the patterned interview as a selection instrument. It constitutes a relatively new technique and has not been so widely used as employment tests. Its approach to selection problems is primarily clinical, as contrasted to weighted application blanks and tests, which are psychometric procedures. It is designed to measure the applicant's chief character traits (his stability, industry, ability to get along with others, loyalty, perseverance, self-reliance, and emotional maturity) and his motivation (his incentives to stay on the job and work). It bases its predictions relative to the applicant's suitability on a very simple premise: The best basis for judging what a person will do in the future is to know what he has done in the past.

The patterned interview reviews the applicant's work record; his service record; his schooling; his early environment; his present financial situation; his domestic situation; and his health. In short, the patterned interview is principally a fact-finding procedure, combining information obtained from the applicant with data received from schools

____________________
*
From Personnel, Vol. 23, 1947, pp. 2-11.

-17-

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