Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

The foregoing findings indicate that the patterned interview, if carefully conducted, his value in predicting the subsequent job success and stability of persons employed in two factory occupations and as truck drivers. While several of the validities are not exceptionally high, allowance must also be made for some unreliability in the criteria where they consist of supervisors' ratings. In every case, however, the validities are of sufficient magnitude to justify the assumption that the interview has definite merit as a selection instrument.

Earlier workers have maintained that the interview is notoriously unreliable. Findings reported here support the conviction that a properly conducted and evaluated planned interview is a statistically reliable selection instrument. The "true" reliability of a predictive variable is equal to or greater than its "true" validity--i.e., accuracy of prediction may approach, but cannot surpass, the accuracy of the instrument used in making the prediction. It follows from this statistical axiom that patterned interview validities of .43, .61, and .68, with probable errors as low as ±.02, are evidence that the reliability of those interviews was at or above such limits. These studies demonstrate that the interview can be a reliable and valid selection instrument.


4. Job Expectancy and Survival*

Joseph Weitz

IN AN INVESTIGATION1 of job satisfaction of life insurance agents, we found that those agents who said the manager misrepresented the job or job possibilities during the hiring interview were more likely to terminate than those who did not agree with this statement. From other data, we also found that new agents having a realistic job concept were more likely to survive than those whose job expectancy was not as accurate.

From these two pieces of information, the hypothesis was made that when potential agents are given a clear picture of their job duties, they are more likely to survive on the job.

____________________
*
From Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 40, No. 4, 1956, pp. 245-47.
1
J. Weitz and R. C. Nuckols, "Job Satisfaction and Job Survival," Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 39, 1955, pp. 294-300.

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