Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

Section Two
PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL

Introduction

AFTER INDIVIDUALS are selected and placed in jobs, it becomes important to evaluate how well they are performing. As we shall see, this is not as simple as it sounds. The development of adequate methods of measuring job proficiency is one of the most difficult problems in personnel psychology. Yet, such measures are essential as a basis for promotion and transfer, evaluation of the need for and results of training, estimating labor costs, determining wages, and for other purposes. Job proficiency measures are also important as "criterion measures" against which to validate tests and the other selection procedures described in the previous section.

It is desirable to make these measurements as objective as possible. Where the job allows for measurement of "units produced," "errors made," etc., the problem may not seem as difficult. However, even here people differ in their experience, in the quality of their machines, in the quotas they are given, etc., and steps must be taken to insure comparability of the measures taken. The article by Brogden and Taylor discusses some of the problems and procedures involved in obtaining dependable criteria of employee effectiveness. In "Measuring On-the-Job Performance--Applying Cost Accounting Concepts to Criterion Construction," they present a rationale for converting production units, errors, time consumed of other personnel, etc., into dollar units. They also show how a proper combination of performance indices may yield an over-all estimate of the employee's contribution to the effectiveness of the organization.

Often it is not possible or feasible to use direct measures of "on-the- job" performance in evaluating employee proficiency. The "job sample test," which involves many principles of achievement testing, is one approach to this problem. The article by Bresnard and Briggs, "A System Simulator for Measuring Job Proficiency" shows how this method was extended to a highly complex job.

The next three articles illustrate some developments in the field called "merit rating." This field has been the center of some controversy. Some critics feel it is unethical for one man to be in the position of rating

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 638

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.