Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview
4. The possibility of increasing the similarity between simulator and operational equipment performance is suggested by clearer instructions to the student regarding the fidelity with which the simulator represents normal equipment functions.
5. Some of the mentioned characteristics of the simulator are relevant to an evaluation of the simulator as a training device. However, these would only suggest its training value when used for intensive practice of procedures. Experimental data on the training values of the device are not now available.

12. Developing an Employee Merit Rating Procedure*

Reign Bittner

I SHOULD LIKE to consider for a moment this question: "Shall we or shall we not rate the people who work for us?" This is a question that perennially crops up to plague us. Almost every management publication we pick up has something to say on this question. And busy executives often spend valuable time discussing the pros and cons of it.

The fact of the matter is that there is only one answer to the question. Most certainly we are going to rate our people; we have no choice between rating and not rating. As long as two people are thrown together, each will make judgments about the other. Even if our population were reduced to the proverbial "last man on earth," he would form judgments about various aspects of his environment. And forming judgments about people or things is all that we mean by rating.

We do have a choice to make, however, as to how we make our ratings. We can decide to indulge in making capricious judgments about people, with each rater giving full rein to his own standards and biases. Or we can choose to rate people according to an organized and systematic procedure which attempts to set up common standards of judgment which all raters can apply uniformly and without bias. Obviously, the latter choice is the wiser one. Having made this choice, then, it becomes necessary to accept some form of merit rating procedure, for it is the tool that enables judgments to be formed systematically and on common bases.

____________________
*
From Personnel Psychology, Vol. 1, 1948, pp. 403-32.

-95-

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