Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview
What are the prospects for using this type of rating scale in industry? My feeling is that it is a coming thing, but it has not yet arrived. There are several reasons for my attitude. In the first place, this rating scale will work only when the method of scoring the rater's evaluations is kept secret, and I am not at all sure that industry is ready to do this.1 It would certainly take a real job of selling to convince the rater and labor unions that this was either wise or necessary. In the second place, the research necessary to develop the rating scale will prove a barrier for many companies, especially if they are small. Perhaps a general scale that will apply to supervisors wherever you find them will eventually be developed, but at the present time it is believed that each organization must have one tailor-made to its own measure.
13. Establishing a Graphic-Rating Scale*
Lee Stockford and H. W. BissellBY NOW, enough has been written in the form of textbook chapters and formal articles on the subject of merit rating to allow one to make two broad and important generalizations:
1. That the performance of employees in industry is constantly being rated or appraised by their supervisors and others, whether or not these judgments are recorded on a specially constructed scale.
2. That more often than not formal appraisals or ratings are to be preferred over informal appraisals, providing all the conditions and restrictions of scale construction, timing, policy control, training, etc., have been observed.

The purpose of this article is not to restate the fundamental principles underlying the whole rating procedure, but to present the results of a series of controlled statistical studies which were conducted as part of a program to revise the rating procedure at the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, particularly as it affects the review of hourly-rated employees.

For many years, in accordance with its union contract, Lockheed has conducted reviews of its hourly-paid employees every 16 weeks, primarily for the purpose of appraising the value of their work in connection with the merit pay increase program. Several years ago, in order to make the 16-week reviews more "objective," supervisors were required

____________________
*
From "Factors Involved in Establishing a Merit-Rating Scale," Personnel, Vol. 26, 1949, pp. 94-116.
1
Editor's note: Since this article first appeared many companies have adopted "forced choice" programs.

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 638

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.