Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

with the applicable nontypist means, the per cent transfer was

,

which equals 58%.

Differences between scores on the Part I final examination and on the Part II final examination were tested by analysis of variance techniques. For the analyses, Ss' scores were partitioned by typewriter, experience, class and instructor--class and instructor being necessarily confounded. This confounding is unimportant for the purposes of the study, however, since only the typewriter comparison is of primary interest. To obtain an equal number of cases in each category after losing one S through hospitalization, a S from each of the other seven categories, with the same rank on the test immediately preceding the hospitalization, was discarded, leaving nine Ss in each of the eight categories. The results of this analysis showed that there were no practical differences between the electric and manual typewriter Ss on either final examination.

It was concluded that, under the current operational conditions at the San Diego RM School, electric typewriters offer no advantages over manual typewriters for typing instruction. It should be emphasized that inferences regarding typing instruction under different practical training conditions (e.g., where it is necessary to continue typing instruction until students reach a higher proficiency level) are not warranted on the basis of this experiment.


SUMMARY

Electric and manual typewriters were compared as teaching devices under the current instructional operating conditions at the San Diego Radioman School. Experimental and control groups were trained on electric and manual typewriters, respectively, with the experimental groups switching to manual typewriters for the last fourth of the training. Typing proficiency was measured by a series of tests composed of cipher groups. It was found that students trained on manual typewriters performed as well as students trained on electric typewriters. There was considerable positive transfer of training from electric to manual typewriters but direct practice on manual typewriters was preferable.

-172-

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