Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

JOB INTERFERENCE WITH OTHER SATISFACTION SOURCES

Three questions about the interference of employment with sources of satisfaction in home or community showed significant differences between the responses of the resigned workers and those of matched people who remained. These questions indicated that those who resigned felt that they were kept from doing things at home, that their jobs were interfering with their social life, and were preventing participation in clubs and similar activities. These differences are all about one-half of a unit on a ten-unit scale and are significantly different from zero at the 3 per cent level, or better.

Since the resigned employees reported greater dissatisfaction on the job and more interference with family and social life, the possibility was suggested that the dissatisfaction on the job might be due to the outside difficulties. However, when correlations were computed between the various interference responses and the on-the-job lack of need satisfaction, most of the correlation coefficients turned out to be quite small. The largest of these coefficients was r = .22. While this correlation is significantly greater than zero at the 5 per cent level, it hardly leads us to believe that workers will say very often that they are dissatisfied on grounds of personal needs when actually the job interferes with home life, or vice versa. We have concluded, therefore, that on-the-job deprivations and off-the-job interferences are independent social forces upon workers toward resigning.


OTHER ITEMS

The responses of the resigned workers on several other questions were not different from those made by persons who stayed with the company. These concerned the quality of supervision, the adequacy of on-the-job training, and the necessity for having a job. The discriminating ability of this last question was to some extent reduced by the control on personal characteristics. The people whose responses were compared are in the same life circumstances because they were matched in respect to their job motivation and thus have essentially similar needs for continued employment. It is also interesting to note that those who resigned did not rate their ability to do the job significantly lower than those who stayed.

We also asked workers whether they feel that the community has respect for workers in this industry and how well the employee's family and friends understand their work. None of these items was found to be significantly related to leaving.


SUMMARY

In this study we establish the fact that the degree of satisfaction of certain personal needs supplied by a person's place of employment has a

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