Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

Would a more therapeutic or individualistic approach produce greater or more permanent effects? At least it would seem that something more than classroom training is probably needed if real changes in the attitudes or behavior of supervisors is to be expected.

Similar evaluations of the training in the plant situation need to be made in other plants and in other industries. This drop in "consideration" and the trend in increased "structuring" may not occur in other industrial situations. It may be, for example, that the overall "leadership climate" in this plant was lower in "consideration" than the overall "climate" in some other plant. This study afforded no opportunity for comparing this plant on the whole with some other plant.

In general, interest in the course among foremen is very high. Enthusiasm at the verbal level is almost universal. A frequent comment made by the foremen during the course was, "I certainly wish my own boss would get this course." Favorable comments about the course also are expressed by people at all levels in the organization. The writer sat through the course and was very favorably impressed with the teaching methods and the participation of the foremen. Before any reorganization of the course, criterion research revealing what to teach, and further research on how to make the effects of what is taught more permanent should be undertaken.


34. Influence: A Key to Effective Leadership in the First-Line Supervisor*

Donald C. Pelz

THE SPOTLIGHT these days is very much on the first-line supervisor. The reasons are obvious--and good ones. The first-line supervisor is the most direct link between employees and management. On him hangs much of the responsibility for seeing that employees understand and support the goals adopted by management. And in turn he is responsible for seeing that the employees' difficulties and complaints get transmitted up the line and that these problems get solved. Much management attention has therefore been concentrated on this link. Are your employees unhappy or unproductive? The popular panacea is: Put your first-line supervisors through another training course.

But what is this flood of training supposed to accomplish? How is the

____________________
*
From Personnel, Vol. 29, 1952, pp. 209-17.

-328-

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