Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

most able supervisors and managers are struggling in company alter company with trial-and-error methods to discover how to improve their supervision.

It is possible to wait for this trial-and-error process gradually to evolve and to make clear what the new organization and management theory and processes will be. It would be faster and much more efficient to use the power of systematic research and experimentation to accelerate their discovery and refinement.

In my judgment, those companies which support and cooperate in research to discover improved processes of management and to train their personnel will have a distinct advantage over companies which do not. Those which support research will discover at an earlier date the principles and practices which the successful companies of the future will be using and in which their own developing executives and managers should be trained. They will not experience the tragedy and cost of obsolete management.


36. An Evaluation of Two Attitudinal Approaches to Delegation*

Allen R. Solem

CURRENT PROBLEM-SOLVING procedures in business and industry indicate that there are many different points of view concerning the supervisory function of delegation. Although there appear to be relatively few problems in delegating the execution of decisions, there is a wide range of opinion concerning the degree to which it is advisable to share the decision-making function itself. Since not all decisions are properly subject to delegation the differences can be attributed in part at least to the types of problems involved. A more important factor, however, seems to be the superior's frame of reference toward his job and his subordinates. Some superiors prefer to decide things on their own with little or no prior consultation; others tend to seek the advice of staff experts or peers before deciding and still others frequently use consultative procedures for obtaining the views of subordinates as a basis for their decisions. Despite these variations in procedure a common factor in most approaches is that the superior must retain the authority

____________________
*
From Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 42, 1958, pp. 36-39.

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