Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

does not carry out their mandates? These are some of the possibilities that can result from the judicial approach without enforcement of the penalty. The experimental results indicated that when the repairman was laid off this action resulted in less success than any other action. Consequently, the value of the judicial approach is doubtful regardless of the final outcome.


Appendix*

A. Role of Jim Welch--Foreman: You are the Foreman of a repair crew of a utility company. You have 12 men who go on jobs and the men usually work alone or in pairs. As foreman you spend your time visiting the work locations of your men, checking on progress, giving such help, training and instruction as is needed You are also responsible for the safety of your men and the company judges you partly on the safety record of our crew. At the present time there is a company safety drive. The slogan is, "No job is so important that it cannot be done safely." The company has passed a ruling that anyone found violating a safety practice will be laid off for 3 weeks.

You have just driven up to the place that Bill Smith is working. You stop your car some distance away (you cannot drive directly to the work location) and see Bill working on top of the pole. As you stop the car you have a distinct impression that Smith snapped his safety belt. Apparently he was working without using his belt and this is a safety practice violation.

Smith is an employee with 20 years of service. He has four children ranging in age from 5 to 12. He is a good workman, but is quite independent in his thinking. You wish to do what you can to correct this man and give him a better attitude toward safety. You have been supervisor of this crew for two years and don't know too much about Bill's past record. You have 10 years service with the company.

B. Role of Bill Smith--Repairman: You are a member of Jim Welch's repair crew in a utility company. You have been in the company for 20 years and for the past two years Jim has been your supervisor. You feel you know the job and consider your technical knowledge perhaps somewhat greater than Welch's who has worked in the company a total of 10 years. You believe Jim has done a fair job as foreman, but feel that he supervises too closely.

You usually work alone on repair jobs except for several visits a week from your supervisor. You are now working on top of a pole and haven't bothered to snap your saftey belt. You are a careful worker and use it when it is necessary, but find it uncomfortable and in the way and so frequently you don't bother to snap it.

Welch has just driven up so you hasten to snap your belt. There is an annual safety drive on and the company has threatened to lay men off for safety violations. You can't afford having time off. You have four children and living expenses use up all your earnings. You are quite sure Jim didn't see you snap your safety belt. He is walking toward your pole now.

____________________
*
Reprinted with permission from N. R. F. Maier, Principles of Human Relations ( New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1952), pp. 106-7.

-368-

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