Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

icate that this pattern possesses unusual abilities for adaptation to sudden and confusing changes of task--a quality lacking in the other two patterns.


A PROMISING FIELD FOR RESEARCH

Clearly, these experiments are only the beginning of a long story. The findings, although they promise much, settle nothing; but they do suggest that an experimental approach to certain aspects of organizational communication is possible and that, in all probability, it would be practically rewarding. As the characteristics of communication nets and their effects upon human performance as they occur in the laboratory become better understood, the need will grow for systematic studies of actual operating organizations. The job of mapping an existing net of communications even in a relatively small company is a complicated and difficult one, but it is not impossible. Some work is beginning on the development of field methods of observation. The importance of bridging the gap between the simple, directly controlled experiment and the very complex, indirectly controlled social situation cannot be overestimated.


42. Barriers and Gateways to Communication*

Carl R. Rogers

IT MAY SEEM curious that a person like myself, whose whole professional effort is devoted to psychotherapy, should be interested in problems of communication. What relationship is there between obstacles to communication and providing therapeutic help to individuals with emotional maladjustments?

Actually the relationship is very close indeed. The whole task of psychotherapy is the task of dealing with a failure in communication. The emotionally maladjusted person, the "neurotic," is in difficulty, first, because communication within himself has broken down and, secondly, because as a result of this his communication with others has been damaged. To put it another way, in the "neurotic" individual parts of himself which have been termed unconscious, or repressed, or denied to aware-

____________________
*
Reprinted from Part I of the article, published in the Harvard Business Review, July-August, 1952.

-408-

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