Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview
1. There were fairly stable individual differences in speed of working, variability of production, frequency of rest pauses, and frequency of talking.
2. These differences showed no consistent relationship to the reports of the workers concerning their feelings of boredom or monotony.
3. No shape of work curve was found which would characterize the individual worker.
4. Work curves for individuals forming social groups showed no observable relationship with each other.
5. The approach of the closing hour had a noticeable effect on the production of many of the workers. The direction of the change in rate which appeared at the end of the day was determined by the concept of a day's work held by the worker.
6. Boredom is not necessarily accompanied by a depression in the curve of output, nor is a sag necessarily accompanied by feeling of boredom.
7. Output curves should be viewed with caution as indications of the subjective feelings of the worker.

There can be little quarrel with the claim of the British investigators that, other factors being equal, workers tend to slow down, talk, become restless and variable in their production when bored. In most industrial situations, however, one cannot assume that all other factors are equal, and many of these factors may heavily outweigh the influence of interest or boredom in producing changes in working behavior.


52. Authorized and Unauthorized Rest Pauses in Clerical Work*

William McGehee and Edwin B. Owen

HERSEY,1 VERNON,2 and others have demonstrated that workers employed in light and heavy industrial work manage to take rest pauses even when such rest pauses are not authorized by the employer. The

____________________
*
From Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 24, 1940, pp. 605-14.
1
R. B. Hersey, "Rest--Authorized and Unauthorized," Journal of Personnel Research, Vol. 4, 1925, pp. 37-45.
2
H. M. Vernon, T. Bedford, and C. G. Warner, "Rest Pauses in Heavy and Moderately Heavy Industrial Work" ( London: Industrial Fatigue Research Board, Report No. 41, 1927).

-497-

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