Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview
people who have more than the average number of accidents but they should not be automatically classified as excessively accident prone without further evidence. Actually within a simple chance distribution some people are likely to have two to three times as many accidents as the average person. One can verify this by referring to the Poisson distributions in our tables. In most published distributions only a very small minority have accident records which lie completely above the point at which the Poisson distribution gives negligible values. As one approaches this point, one finds additional cases of more than average accident proneness, but some people with only average accident proneness who have had bad luck or temporary difficulties are also included in the group of people who have had many accidents. The problem of the exact estimation of the relative number of accident-prone individuals and bad luck individuals in any particular group of accident records is complicated. One should not attempt to make rough estimates without a comparison of obtained frequencies with the corresponding Poisson frequencies.
SUMMARY
1. A commonly used method of comparing percentages of men and of accidents proves nothing about the existence of differences in accident proneness. Examples proving the inconclusive nature of the method are cited.
2. Comparison of obtained accident distributions with simple chance ( Poisson) distributions establishes that there are differences in accident liability but does not indicate whether these differences are large or small and does not exclude the simultaneous operation of unpredictable "chance" factors.
3. Different accident records do not necessarily represent different degrees of accident liability. A method for analysis of the variances of accident records of people into two component variances is suggested, one component attributable to differences in accident liability, the other to unpredictable "chance factors." It is pointed out that the method is only applicable when the obtained distribution resembles a composite of Poisson distributions.
4. A number of published distributions of accidents are examined by the use of the above method. The variance attributable to differences in accident liability varies considerably.

In the distributions which are examined in this paper and which do not involve primarily minor accidents, the variance attributable to differences in accident liability is in most cases between twenty and forty per cent of the total variance of accident records. Although differences in accident liability should not be overlooked as a factor in the different accident records of people, the effect of this factor is rather small as compared to the residual 60 to 80 per cent attributable to unpredictable

-557-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 638

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.