Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview
influence upon accident rate than does experience once the breaking-in stage is passed. From the comparisons made between the matched work groups it has been found that older workers tend to have fewer accidents than their younger co-workers. This appears to be true throughout the employee's work history when similar groups are compared. Lower accident rates are remarkably characteristic of these older men from their earliest job performance on.It is the author's opinion, although no conclusive evidence is presented, that since age exerts the stronger influence upon accident frequency rate, beyond initial employment, it is necessary to explain accidents in part on the basis of immaturity of employees. Furthermore, the usually found reduction in accident rate with increasing age and experience can also be attributed to some extent to the operation of a natural selection process which results in the weeding out of workers less fit for the job. It is also felt that little importance can be attached to the effect of experience upon accident rate for periods other than that of initial employment particularly when the effects of age and the natural selection process are eliminated. Proper training in correct work methodology and safety habits can further reduce the effect of experience upon accident rate but cannot apparently substitute completely for actual job performance in helping the worker to internalize fully the correct procedures and habits necessary to efficient operation from the safety standpoint.
59. Psychological Climate and Accidents*
Vernon Keenan, Willard Kerr, and William ShermanIN THE BELIEF that certain factors of psychological climate and physical environment may be of great importance in the causation of accidents in heavy industry, the authors formulated a series of hypotheses concerning correlates of accidents and subjected each to an experimental design for testing. The hypotheses were:
1. Excessive variation in pressure to "get out production" induces stress and tension contributing to accidents.
2. Intensity of normal production schedules contribute to accidents.
____________________
*
From "Psychological Climate and Accidents in an Automotive Plant," Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 2, 1951, pp. 108-11.

The authors gratefully acknowledge the indispensable aid and original suggestions of Mr. Howard M. Huntington, Safety Supervisor, International Harvester Tractor Works.

-565-

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